Why did NFT become popular

Anyway, when one purchases a digital cycling avatar and thus technically owns the image, the transaction is recorded online on the Ethereum blockchain, a digital ledger that tracks who owns what non-thing things. Because minting an NFT is a way of authenticating that asset and ensuring that there is one true owner, the whole NFT situation creates artificial scarcity, thereby making these collectible avatars desirable and at least somewhat valuable.

NFT Trading Has Officially Infiltrated Cycling

While it might be a stretch to say that the world is getting brighter and better, we can definitively argue that it just keeps getting more. interesting.

Today, in yet another turn of events, the bike world has outdone even Henry Quinney in coming up with the farfetched and fantastical. A motley crew has come together to create this project: of an artist with the snappy sobriquet Rich Mitch, who is in charge of creating the avatars that will be sold as NFTs; a retired bike racer, current crypto enthusiast, and 'sockologist' known as Scoop, who seems to be the logistics guy; a '90s road pro and OG mountain bike racer called Wolf who is described as the operation's soigneur; and the founder of one our competitor websites, whom we'll call Tyler, the communicator.

As for the operation itself? It's the world's first blockchain-based cycling community.

Here's how it will work. People - that's you, I guess (?) - will buy into this community by purchasing non-fungible tokens (NFTs), which are essentially collectibles in the form of unique pieces of code that symbolize ownership of digital assets. That's right, you're buying some code that represents authenticity and scarcity that is associated with a picture on the internet, kind of like how you can technically buy a star that you will never visit (or remember where to find) for $34.90 or buy a pair of stars as a useless honeymoon gift for $69.90. Nice.

This cycling NFT project, called Bike Club, will mint 10,000 unique rider avatars that will be sold as NFTs. Owning a so-called Rider grants access to the Club.

A quick glossary:

NFT (non-fungible token): A unique unit of code that represents ownership of an asset traded on the blockchain

Blockchain: A digital ledger that records transactions

NFT minting: The process by which an asset is published on the blockchain and made tradeable

Confusion: A feeling with which I am familiar

Anyway, when one purchases a digital cycling avatar and thus technically owns the image, the transaction is recorded online on the Ethereum blockchain, a digital ledger that tracks who owns what non-thing things. Because minting an NFT is a way of authenticating that asset and ensuring that there is one true owner, the whole NFT situation creates artificial scarcity, thereby making these collectible avatars desirable and at least somewhat valuable.

But wait. While buying an NFT to own the certified version of an image and get your user ID in a public ledger somewhere on the internet seems like an adventure in hubristic self-congratulations, we do sincerely have to give the project some credit in that it will tangibly benefit bike communities. Bike Club NFT has pledged to donate 10% of all royalties and revenues to organizations and people that improve biking locally and on large scales. The club will draw upon its members to steer the club's charitable initiatives. (It seems too direct to suggest simply donating the money you'd spend on avatar ownership to the charitable organization of your choice.)

For those who would prefer to focus on the personal benefits of owning an NFT avatar, Bike Club membership will also include access to VIP areas at bike industry events; access to a private Strava club; deals and opportunities to spend IRL cold, hard cash on products from partner brands; and membership in a private Twitter group and the club's Discord server - think Slack, but for after-hours. The whole thing is challenging my understanding of what a bicycling club does. There must be a part where one. rides a bicycle? But maybe I'm just missing the point.

Bike Club will begin minting NFTs in January 2022 for Stage 1. Once 20% of the avatars are sold, Bike Club plans to make its first charitable donation of $40,000 USD, eventually making five $40,000 USD donations by the time they all sell. Once Bike Club enters Stage 2, it'll mint a series of mountain biker avatars (the first ones will be roadies). Around the same time, mysterious hidden features and special powers will be announced pertaining to the original Riders. It's unclear what exactly that means, but Bike Club suggests that it might be beneficial to own multiple Riders - a whole team, even - because not all Riders have the same secret skills. The charitable donations will continue in Stage 2.

These normal and understandable happenings will continue into Stage 3, when Bike Club hints it may start its own cryptocurrency and / or pursue some type of gamification in the Metaverse and / or form a DAO, or a decentralized autonomous organization. A DAO is a cryptocurrency-driven, user-governed community. What could happen from there? I'm not convinced even the sky is a limit at this point.

While this seems like it'll be the largest-scale NFT project in cycling so far, it's not the first. The first cycling NFT was a digital rendering of a one-off Colnago C64, which sold earlier this year for $8,592 USD, which happens to be $2,300 USD more than the price of an actual, rideable, Colnago C64. The bike depicted in the image never actually existed in the physical world, but in theory, Colnago said it would be the lightest frameset in the company's history. If it existed. Which it doesn't and never will. Note that it's not an image of the bike itself that was sold, but the right to call oneself the owner of the image. As for the image itself? Check it out.

There she is, just twirling around, ready to be admired by literally any of us who decide to look at it, but owned solely by someone called User MTD-01.

The next NFT that's made headlines in the cycling world was also sold earlier this year. Our sister site CyclingTips covered the story, in which the Tour de France team Bahrain Victorious unveiled and then destroyed its new team kit. The jerseys, which some assumed the team would, uh, wear, were destroyed shortly after the presentation ceremony, but a digital image of one was minted and auctioned off as an NFT for roughly $400 USD. (It's worth mentioning that the money was donated to the Royal Humanitarian Foundation, which sounds nice until you learn that the RHF is chaired by the very same Sheikh Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa that a.) launched Team Bahrain Victorious and b.) has been accused of egregious human rights violations when he tortured dissidents during Bahrain's 2011 pro-democracy political uprising.)

All of that is to say that this Bike Club NFT project is a big step in, well, a direction. I'm not sure which direction, but lord, I cannot wait to find out.

I'll acknowledge that I'm cynical about it, and maybe I'm just old-fashioned and NFTs do have more merit than I like to admit. The idea of staking claim on images that have no physical existence or use isn't all that different from, like, things we care a lot about that do have actual implications for our daily lives, so there's likely something to this whole blockchain thing. If enough people collectively give something meaning, then it could be the most important thing in the world. Money? That exists only by human agreement. Words are just symbolic scribbles and sounds. Time? Social construct. F*ck it, nothing is real and this is all just a fever dream, right? Let's go biking while biking is still part of biking.

“When you go through really hard things with people, you tend to bond. And that’s something I would be conscious of. If our whole relationship is built on being scared, that can be a roller coaster of a relationship,” he said.

Confidence boost

Another reason we enjoy being scared is because making it through a haunted house or a scary movie can give us a boost of confidence.

“I think that it’s a challenge,” Jason said. “We’re apprehensive, but we rise up to that challenge, and there’s kind of a victory associated with doing hard, scary things.”

Jason said this sense of accomplishment seems to carry more weight with friends, which is why you don’t see many people going solo to a haunted house. He thinks it could be because there isn’t anyone to witness our bravery or accomplishment, but there’s also the fact that most thing are more fun with friends.

Skin lightening could also have been accelerated by something as simple as genetic drift, making it “easier” for a pale skin mutations to succeed in northern latitudes.

Why Did People Become White?

Humans come in a rainbow of hues, from dark chocolate browns to nearly translucent whites.

This full kaleidoscope of skin colors was a relatively recent evolutionary development, according to biologists, occuring alongside the migration of modern humans out of Africa between 100,000 and 50,000 years ago.

The consensus among scientists has always been that lower levels of vitamin D at higher latitudes — where the sun is less intense — caused the lightening effect when modern humans, who began darker-skinned, first migrated north.

But other factors might be at work, a new study suggests. From the varying effects of frostbite to the sexual preferences of early men, a host of theories have been reviewed.

Vitamin iDea

Vitamin D plays an important role in bone growth and the body's natural protection against certain diseases, and the inability to absorb enough in areas of less-powerful sunlight would have decreased life expectancies in our African ancestors. The further north they trekked, the more vitamin D they needed and the lighter they got over the generations, due to natural selection.

This explanation accounts for the world's gradients of skin color traveling south to north, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among African immigrants to higher latitudes, as well as the relatively darker skin of Canada's Inuit peoples, who have good levels of vitamin D despite living in the Arctic, due to their diet rich in oily fish.

Sounds about right . right?

In fact, there might have been a number of concurrent evolutionary pressures at work that contributed to the development of lighter skin, according to a new study published in the August issue of the Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology.

“In our opinion the vitamin D hypothesis is one of the most likely hypotheses responsible for skin lightening, although there still is no consensus about it,” said study author Asta Juzeniene of the Oslo University Hospital in Oslo, Norway.

A number of competing theories were explained and evaluated by Juzeniene and her team, reopening a debate that remains one of the most interesting and controversial in biology.

Paling in comparison

Sexual selection may have played a role, for one, with males preferring paler skin in northern latitudes, the researchers surmised.

“One of the hypotheses is that men seem to prefer women with a light skin color, which can be regarded as a sign of youth and fertility,” Juzeniene told LiveScience. “Because light skin characterizes the early infant stage of primates, it may have become a visual cue that triggers appropriate adult behavior toward infants, i.e. decreased aggressiveness and increased desire to provide care and protection,” she said.

As lighter skin became associated with increased health in northerly latitudes, men may have preferred mates with lighter skin and produced ever-paler generations. Fertility and health statistics at different latitudes from a few thousand years ago aren't available, Juzeniene cautioned, however, so the theory is difficult to test.

Frostbite was another causal effect investigated by the researchers.

Some reports from American soldiers serving in the Korean War and elsewhere have indicated that dark skin is more prone to frostbite than white because it emits more heat. In colder climates, evolution could have negatively selected for paler skin if frostbite was significant enough to perhaps kill darker-skinned children.

Despite the anecdotal evidence, there is not enough scientific data to support frostbite as a strong enough single factor to lighten skin in places such as Europe, the researchers said.

On the farm

Another possibility noted was the switch from subsistence-based economies to agriculture approximately 10,000 years ago, which eliminated vitamin D-rich food sources from the diet. This would have had an especially potent effect in northern Europe, according to Juzeniene and her team.

“Development of agriculture has occurred in several places, and did not necessarily lead to skin lightening if the ambient UVB [ultraviolet light from the sun] level was sufficiently high to allow adequate vitamin D synthesis. Cold climates and high latitudes would speed up the need for skin lightening,” however, if people were relying mainly on grains as a food source, the researchers wrote.

The main problem with this agriculture theory is that the switch from gathering to farming occurred relatively recently, and scientists question whether all of the evolutionary changes associated with skin color could have happened so quickly.

Skin lightening could also have been accelerated by something as simple as genetic drift, making it “easier” for a pale skin mutations to succeed in northern latitudes.

Though other elements may have come into play and need to be examined further, vitamin D remains the most likely explanation, Juzeniene stressed, especially given its role in overall health.

“If we assume that vitamin D does not play any role in the development of human skin color, neither white nor dark, many people in the world would suffer from vitamin D deficiency,” she said.

While people of all skin types have the ability to produce the same amount of vitamin D in their systems, “highly pigmented people will need to stay in the sun around 6 times longer than light people in order to synthesize the same amount of vitamin D,” Juzeniene said, and a lack of the vitamin — something occurring among many American children right now, partly because they don't get out much — can make humans more susceptible to everything from heart disease to internal cancers.

But, our ears are not digital. Our ears are analog. When you get your ear next to a real instrument and pluck its strings or press its keys, you hear a timbre, a texture in the sound that is very difficult to reproduce. There are subtleties and nuances that often get lost in recordings.

Broken Secrets

There have always been cool record shops in the hip parts of town hocking vinyl to the enthusiasts. But, it had been a long time since the major record stores carried them, until last year.

Maybe you’ve noticed, maybe not. But if you’ve been into BestBuy recently, some of their stores have a massive vinyl record selection. A year ago, they had a few, now they have hundreds. It’s not every store, but some of them.

For many people, it’s probably hard to imagine that anyone would go back to using records.

Records are not convenient to use. They don’t play for very long, about 26 minutes before you have to flip it over or put a new one on. You can’t easily skip songs at the push of a button. They have to be kept very clean to sound good. The needle drags on the record so the sound degrades over time and worst of all, they are expensive.

Since all of these drawbacks are easily overcome by digital formats like CDs and MP3s, it surely makes people wonder, why are vinyl records making a mainstream comeback?

It’s a good question and to understand the answer, we have to know a little bit about the difference between digital and analog recordings.

Digital recordings are great because the data doesn’t change over time. You can playback a CD or MP3 thousands of times and it will sound exactly the same every time. But, although that recording is the same every time, it’s not necessarily a perfect representation of the live music that it is a recording of.

Most musical instruments are analog, when a guitar string is plucked or a drum is hit, that object vibrates at a certain speed, causing an analog sound wave to travel across the room and make your eardrum vibrate. Our brain interprets that vibration as sound. In a recording, that sound is received by a microphone and recorded. During playback, that information is turned back into sound waves when your speakers vibrate. Speakers are rated in quality by their ability to vibrate exactly like the instruments did that made the original sound in the recording.

On a CD or in an MP3s, there are no such thing as waves. Everything is recorded as a one or zero. So, to make waves, they stores lots of ones and zeros for every second of music (44,100/second on a CD). These ones and zeros approximately represent the original wave that was produced by the vibrating guitar string. The key part of that is “approximately.” If you’ve ever tried to make a round object with LEGO, you know what I mean. You can get it to look almost round, but it’s not perfect, it’s kind of jagged.

Digital recordings are also jagged. Digital players have an analog to digital converter that tries to guess what the wave form would have looked like, based on the jagged forms that are made with the digital data. Because there are so many ones and zeros, it sounds almost exactly like the original recording and some players are better than others at filling in those gaps.

The XX - Vinyl Edition

But, our ears are not digital. Our ears are analog. When you get your ear next to a real instrument and pluck its strings or press its keys, you hear a timbre, a texture in the sound that is very difficult to reproduce. There are subtleties and nuances that often get lost in recordings.

Record enthusiasts like analog recordings because they more closely represent sound in the way that our hearing works. If you use an analog amplifier, there is no digital to analog conversion, making the experience very similar to being at the live recording.

Records are also large (up to 12 inches in diameter) and maybe they only play for 26 minutes and show their age over time. But, that has a certain romance, like a hand written letter instead of an email. Email has its obvious benefits, but when you get a hand written letter, it is special.

Records are not for everyone and they’re not for every situation. I don’t expect to see portable record players any time soon and I wouldn’t give up my MP3 player either.

Bonus Secrets: The Olympic Medals in the photo in yesterday’s post are the medals won by Nancy Greene in the 1968 Winter Olympics. She also carried the Vancouver 2010 torch when it passed through Kamloops, BC.

Many of the top commenters on the video did not hold back on what they think about Ubisoft incorporating NFTs into the “Ghost Recon” game. One viewer wrote, “Ubisoft, once again, giving us something we didn't ask for, don't want and won't enjoy.”

Why did NFT become popular

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Ubisoft NFT platform’s now-delisted trailer garners 37,000 dislikes vs. 1,400 likes on YouTube

From the ‘Ghost Recon Breakpoint’ gameplay walkthrough trailer | Photo credit: Ubisoft North America / YouTube screenshot

Ubisoft recently launched its NFT platform called Quartz, along with an announcement trailer. However, the dislikes it garnered are overwhelmingly higher than its likes count, suggesting that many video game fans are not thrilled about the new service.

The trailer in question runs for a minute and 19 seconds and provides an overview of how Ubisoft Quartz will work. It also highlights the first round of NFT drops from the publisher, which includes three in-game cosmetics to be given for free and will be playable on “Ghost Recon Breakpoint.”

The video, however, was released after Google removed the YouTube dislikes counter from public viewing. But there are browser extensions that allow viewers to circumvent the contested YouTube update, revealing that the Ubisoft Quartz trailer has 37,000 dislikes and only 1,400 likes at the moment.

Ubisoft North America / YouTube screenshot

Ubisoft has since delisted the Ubisoft Quartz trailer from YouTube. But people who have access to the video’s link can still view it. It is unclear, though, if the video’s delisting was due to the overwhelmingly negative feedback.

Many of the top commenters on the video did not hold back on what they think about Ubisoft incorporating NFTs into the “Ghost Recon” game. One viewer wrote, “Ubisoft, once again, giving us something we didn't ask for, don't want and won't enjoy.”

This is not the first time that video game fans voiced their disagreement with a Ubisoft announcement through the YouTube dislike button. Just last October, the publisher announced it is developing a first-person shooter battle royale game called “Ghost Recon Frontline.”

Shortly after its announcement, there was an immense dislike-to-like ratio, along with scathing responses on YouTube comments and other online platforms. Just a couple of weeks after those events unfolded, Ubisoft announced it had postponed the Closed Test for the online multiplayer.

The launch of Quartz, where Ubisoft will release playable NFTs called Digits, made the company one of the biggest game publishers to jump into the NFT hype. Despite how people have reacted to the launch of Quartz, Ubisoft has heavily implied that it has more plans of merging its projects with blockchain. “This large-scale experiment is the next step in Ubisoft’s four-year exploration of blockchain technology,” the company said in a press release.

Corset, waistcoats, skirts, kilts, safari jackets, top hats, and goggles were all in evidence and worn with little regard to gender. This was way beyond my comfort zone. But I was not alone: The Steampunk band Abney Park was on stage with Inc. I turned to the lead singer, Captain Robert, and asked, ‘Is it time?’ The captain was bent double, sorting through cables on the deck. I Ie turned, smiled, and said, ‘it’s all you!’ By THE TIME STEAMPUNK WORKSHOP FOUNDER JAKE VON SLATT HAD stepped onto that stage, Steampunk had already reached critical mass following the publication of Ruth La Ferla’s article “Steampunk Moves Between 2 Worlds” in the Style section of the New York Time on May 8, 2008.

2010 06 17 Fantasy Why is the Genre so Popular Rowena Cory Daniells

Blinded by the bright lights, I looked down at the audience from the stage. How many people were out there? A thousand? Five thousand? I couldn’t tell. All I knew it was: These were my people. Steampunks. Some wore full on period correct Victorian outfits, but even I wore dressed in an eclectic manner that combined Victorian clothing with punk and goth fashion along with elements common to the classic pulp or B-movie adventurer.

Corset, waistcoats, skirts, kilts, safari jackets, top hats, and goggles were all in evidence and worn with little regard to gender. This was way beyond my comfort zone. But I was not alone: The Steampunk band Abney Park was on stage with Inc. I turned to the lead singer, Captain Robert, and asked, ‘Is it time?’ The captain was bent double, sorting through cables on the deck. I Ie turned, smiled, and said, ‘it’s all you!’ By THE TIME STEAMPUNK WORKSHOP FOUNDER JAKE VON SLATT HAD stepped onto that stage, Steampunk had already reached critical mass following the publication of Ruth La Ferla’s article “Steampunk Moves Between 2 Worlds” in the Style section of the New York Time on May 8, 2008.

This article merely reflected a full flowering of the retro-futuristic movement that had its roots in a fascination with Victoriana and the fiction of Jules Verne, but it also brought Steampunk to a wider audience and arguably legitimized the movement.

I have always been taught to view failure is “an opportunity to learn and grow” and that some of the experiences that we go through in our lives (particularly the bad the ones)–often times turn out to be blessings in disguise.

10 Famous Entrepreneurs Who Failed in Business Before Becoming Successful

Happy Tuesday All! I hope that you had a very pleasant Fourth of July Holiday. Yesterday I ran across an interesting post from Addicted2Success.com that featured 15 Rich & Famous People Who Were Fired Before They Became Successful . This post prompted me to write today’s blog post.

I have always been taught to view failure is “an opportunity to learn and grow” and that some of the experiences that we go through in our lives (particularly the bad the ones)–often times turn out to be blessings in disguise.

Today, I will be presenting a list of 10 famous people who failed in business before becoming successful – who were either fired from their jobs, took payday loans to invest in their dreams or experienced multiple setbacks and failures in their business before becoming successful:

1. Walt Disney

walt-disney

Walt Disney is the businessman behind the very successful theme park “Walt Disney World“. Walt Disney was reportedly fired by a newspaper editor for not having good ideas and no imagination. Disney World is currently valued at $35 Billion dollars.

2. Thomas Edison

Thomas_Edison2

Before becoming successful, Thomas Edison tried more than 10,000 times to invent the light bulb. When Asked about his failures, Edison stated that he knew “definitively over 9,000 ways that an electric light bulb will not work.”

3. Fred Smith

fred_smith_fedex

Founder of hugely successful company “Fed Ex” Smith’s college professor stated that his concept of Federal Express was “interesting, but not feasible”.

4. Steve Jobs

steve jobs

Steve Jobs was actually fired from Apple Computers, the very company that he is responsible for making it the success it is today. When Jobs was fired from Apple, he was quoted stating “I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.”

5. Oprah Winfrey

oprah_winfrey

Hailed as the “ Queen of Daytime Talk TV” Winfrey was fired from her news reporter gig at a Baltimore news station. Oprah went on to build a successful following from her daytime talk show “The Oprah Winfrey Show”. Oprah’s net worth is currently valued at 2.7 billion dollars.

6. Steven Spielberg

steven-spielberg-66588

Steven Spielberg was rejected from film school 3 times before getting his huge break. Spielberg is known for directing mega hits that include Jurassic Park and Jaws.

7. Bernie Marcus and Arthur Blank

0511_BernieMarcus

Founders of the home improvement chain “The Home Depot” Marcus and Blank were fired from Corporate America in 1989. These savvy businessmen went on to turn their Big Box store into a huge success and currently have over 2,200 retail stores in the United States with revenues exceeding 74.8 billion dollars.

8. Tim Ferris

tim-ferriss

Known for his best selling book “The 4 Hour Workweek” was turned down by 25 publishers before it was finally picked up. Tim’s book went on to sell millions of copies making him a force to be reckoned with in the Entrepreneurship landscape. He now has an estimated net worth of approximately $100 Million based on Astrogrowth.

9. Colonel Sanders

Col Sanders

Colonel Sanders is the entrepreneur who founded KFC “Kentucky Fried Chicken” when he was 56 years old. His recipe was reportedly rejected over 1,000 times before a restaurant picked it up.

10. Henry Ford

Henry_ford_1919

Ford founded two automotive companies that failed before he was able to gain success with the Ford Motor Company. At his time of death, Ford’s estimated net worth was $188 billion dollars.

These stories prove that sometimes in business sometimes failure can be our best motivator. I hope that today’s blog post will give you a boost of empowerment and motivation in your small business and will help you to continue down the path of entrepreneurship.

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'I have lived with this film and the story surrounding it for 30 years,' Santilli said in the release. 'When I first saw the CIA papers with their verification of the Roswell event and Alien Autopsy film, a massive weight was lifted from my shoulders. I believe the technology we enjoy today started in 1947 with the Roswell crash and that the NFT and single film frame being offered is by far one of the most valuable items to even come up in auction.'

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Mystery of the 1947 Roswell wreckage

In July 1947, a rancher reported pieces of debris scattered over his land.

Authorities were called to the scene and after investigating the wreckage, determined the pieces were from a flying sauce.

The local paper's front page story reported that the Roswell Army field recovered a flying saucer on a New Mexico Ranch after metallic-looking, light but strong material was scattered across the land.

'The intelligence office of the 509th Bombardment Group at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today, that the field has come into the possession of a Flying Saucer,' Roswell Daily Record reported on July 8, 1947.

However, shortly after the 'UFO' discovery made headlines, the War Department in Washington released a statement claiming the debris was the remains of a weather balloon.

Controversy surrounding the film and its authenticity has existed for years.

In 1995, footage from the film was broadcast on Fox as an hour-long documentary entitled, Alien Autopsy: Fact or Fiction, hosted by Jonathan Frakes.

In 2006, Santilli eventually admitted that the footage was a 'reconstruction' of what he said he previously viewed and that only a 'few frames' were from the 1947 film, but never specified which ones.

Separately that year, special-effects designer named John Humphreys claimed that he had created the figure in the footage and appeared in the film as one of the pathologists, according to Live Science.

However, a leaked 2001 memo was reportedly obtained by aerospace billionaire Robert Bigelow (obtained from the archives of former NASA astronaut Edgar Mitchell) which discusses a CIA scientist Kit Green saying the film and the cadaver are real.

'The Alien Autopsy film/video is real, the alien cadaver is real, and the cadaver seen in the film/video is the same as the photos Kit saw at the 1987/88 Pentagon briefing,' Green said in a 2001 briefing at the Pentagon, according to release.

Bigelow has connections to former US Senator Harry Reid.

While in office, Reid obtained funding for the now-defunct Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, some of which went to Bigelow Aerospace, to investigate unidentified aerial phenomena.

On July 8, 1947, the Roswell Daily Record, citing a statement from Jesse Marcel Sr., reported that the Roswell Army field recovered a flying saucer on a New Mexico Ranch after metallic-looking, light but strong material was scattered across the land.

The local paper

The local paper's front page story reported that the Roswell Army field recovered a flying saucer on a New Mexico Ranch after metallic-looking, light but strong material was scattered across the land. 'The intelligence office of the 509th Bombardment Group at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today, that the field has come into the possession of a Flying Saucer,' Roswell Daily Record reported on July 8, 1947

The Air Force report regarding the event states the debris were pieces from Project Mogal

The Air Force report regarding the event states the debris were pieces from Project Mogal's balloons, sensors and radar reflectors made of thin metal. Pictured is Marcel with the debris

'The intelligence office of the 509th Bombardment Group at Roswell Army Air Field announced at noon today, that the field has come into the possession of a Flying Saucer,' the paper reported.

Marcel Sr. was the first on the scene and led the investigation, which he determined were pieces from an extraterrestrial vehicle.

However, shortly after the 'UFO' discovery made headlines, the War Department in Washington DC released a statement claiming the debris was just remains of a weather balloon.

What are NFTs? The latest cryptocurrency to take over the internet

A Non-Fungible Token (NFT) is a unique digital token encrypted with an artist's signature and which verifies its ownership and authenticity and is permanently attached to the piece.

What do they look like?

Most NFTs include some kind digital artwork, such as photos, videos, GIFs, and music. Theoretically, anything digital could be turned into a NFT.

Where do you buy them?

At the moment, NFTs are most commonly sold in so-called 'drops', timed online sales by blockchain-backed marketplaces like Nifty Gateway, Opensea and Rarible.

Why would I want to own one?

There's an array of reasons why someone may want to buy a NFT. For some, the reason may be emotional value, because NFTs are seen as collectors items. For others, they are seen as an investment opportunity similar to cryptocurrencies, because the value could increase.

When were NFTs created?

Writer and podcaster Andrew Steinwold traced the origins of NFTs back to 2012, with the creation of the Colored Coins cryptocurrency. But NFTs didn't move into the mainstream until five years later, when the blockchain game CryptoKitties began selling virtual cats in 2017.

The economy has seen better days, and everyone is looking to make the most of their IT budget. By using Terminal Services, organizations can squeeze more life out of their desktop computers. Because all the processing occurs at the server end, the desktops are essentially acting as dumb terminals. This means that using existing desktop hardware remains a viable option for much longer than it would if applications were run locally. Likewise, running applications on a terminal server may allow organizations to purchase lower-end desktop hardware than they otherwise would, resulting in cost savings.

Once an organization has adopted Terminal Services, desktops can be configured to run a minimal configuration. This makes the process of provisioning desktops a lot easier. Image files become smaller and can therefore be deployed much more quickly, and the issue of application compatibility testing (at the desktop level) goes away.

I have seen at least one real-world example of an organization that decided to give up its desktop management software after implementing Terminal Services. It had purchased the desktop management software primarily to maintain hardware and software inventories across the organization. Because the vendor required an annual maintenance contract, ongoing costs were associated with using the software. Switching to a Terminal Services environment eliminated the need for software management at the desktop, thereby allowing the organization to reduce expenses by getting rid of its desktop management software.

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